Ginger Preservation Recipes

Getting to know Good Life's young, fresh Ginger Root

Available all October for delivery!  Order here...

Good Life ginger is harvested fresh and delivered the same day.  As a tropical plant grown in the much shorter season of the Northeast, it is a perishable product and is different than the cured ginger we generally find in the store.  Young ginger lends a flavor and freshness to dishes that surpasses cured ginger, as well as opening up more opportunities for culinary experimentation.  Consider trying it raw- grated into greens and root salads- cooked into vegetable dishes or in tea, ginger beer, glazes, sauces etc. 

Storage and perishability considerations

  • Young ginger can be stored in the refrigerator for 10-14 days in a sealed container.
  • Any part of the root not used within 14 days should be frozen in a sealed plastic bag, and can be used for months afterwards.  GLF will deliver ginger well washed, but please double check and remove all dirt before freezing.
  • Use pre-frozen ginger still frozen and return unused portions to the freezer.  Repeated thawing and freezing will damage the storability of the root.

Candied Ginger

From Mary Bouchard, Trumansburg

  • 1 pound fresh ginger root
  • 5 cups water
  • Approximately 1 pound granulated sugar

Directions
Set a cooling rack over a sheet pan.

Peel the ginger root and slice into 1/8-inch thick slices. Place into a 4-quart saucepan with the water and set over medium-high heat. Cover and cook for 35 minutes or until the ginger is tender.

Transfer the ginger to a colander to drain, reserving the cooking liquid. Weigh the ginger and measure out an equal amount of sugar. Return the ginger and 1/4 cup water to the pan and add the sugar. Set over medium-high heat and bring to a boil, stirring frequently. Reduce the heat to medium and cook, stirring frequently, until the sugar syrup looks dry, has almost evaporated and begins to recrystallize, approximately 20 minutes. Transfer the ginger immediately to the cooling rack and spread to separate the individual pieces. Once completely cool, store in an airtight container for up to 2 weeks. Save the sugar that drops beneath the cooling rack and use to top ginger snaps, sprinkled over ice cream or to sweeten coffee.  Save the cooking water in a container in the refrigerator, and use it to make your own ginger ale by adding seltzer water -- adjust the ratio to taste, but start with maybe one part ginger water to 5 parts seltzer.  It's very gingery but not too sweet.  You can sweeten it if you prefer.